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be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with tim geithner, a lot of people have said he is one of the reasons why things are as shaky as they are righ
energy, the same co2 emission. the end of our planet is possible. but there is an enormous chance for us. what they need our products with lower energy consumption. what they need our energy efficient products. who could better develop this than the united states and the europeans, in cooperation together. to combine innovation on climate change with industry and production. that is possible, but only if we are live. therefore i am in favor of a trade agreement. asked what other obstacles there are. a lot of europeans doubting, but i saw better ground here in the united states, in ohio, and i saw for the first time in a swing state, the co2 question played a major role in the election concerning the coal mining question. to avoid any other misunderstanding, i know what it means to close a coal mine for 35,000 inhabitants, most of them employed in the coal mine. when you close down the coal mine, it was an economic disaster. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with pu
journal" and on your program for some time. there is an energy revival in the united states, we know that. it is coming from shale gas, shale oil from fracking in many states. there are environmental issues to consider here. in the meantime, a lot of individuals have leases that they have granted for oil drilling or gas drilling on their private land, most of this is happening on private land so those individuals who own this land are getting income from it. >>shepard: people are flocking to the areas for the jobs. >>guest: north dakota has become a boom state with situations now where there is not enough housing for all of the oil and gas, primarily oil workers coming to the state but it is not just north dakota. the shale oil and gas is positioned all around the united states, in the east, the west coast, and it is ahead in its exploit station in florida and places like the eagle ford field. this is a boom fought to those getting money for the leases they are ranting but lower energy costs. it is like a tax cut for america. >>shepard: if we were to become energy independent, it would ce
a little bit of energy into this thing and it becomes explosive. it is all energy driven. but the issue really is not that is what the emerging world with its -- whether it is time a court india up with different perspectives. i've seen china and india in 2004, maybe 2003, the trade was maybe $2 billion between the countries. today, i think this is where the chinese prime minister comes to india and we're talking $150 billion on the next verizon. this is without drawing claims. i think what asia is looking for is that we can have correlations within each other. without necessarily being aided to. it is a dangerous game, but all games are dangerous. kissinger credit a lifetime career out of it. [laughter] this is the way it is. military power is a dominant element of strategy will not work. as a background element of strategy, yes, it's essential, important, including for the first time two years ago, the pentagon had a conference i was there in which we discussed india and american cooperation in the pacific. never happened before. it does not mean [indiscernible] we are taking position
, multinational leader on a whole range of issues from energy to climate change and we look forward to working with mexico not only on regional issues but also on global issues. >> we also share a very important vision, a vision of creating more jobs. we know this is very important not only for the american people but also for the mexican people. for both our nations. but not only that, we also have the opportunity to integrate north america to be participating in this part of the world. >> suarez: their most immediate challenge may be the surge of drug violence in recent years. outgoing mexican president calderon wage war on the cartels at a cost of 60,000 dead over six years. but last summer, pena nieto told the newshour's margaret warner there has to be a better way. >> it is very clear after several years of this fight on drug trafficking we have more drug consumption and drug use and drug trafficking. that means we're not moving in the right direction. things are not working. i'm not saying that we should legalize it. it's exactly the opposite. i'm against legalization. but with the count
his energies and good name to our effort -- for ratification of the treaty than senator bob dole, a lifelong advocate for disability rights. we need to pass this in a tribute to bob dole, for his life of service to the state of kansas and to the nation as well as his heroic efforts on behalf of the disabled in the united states senate. these people have come together to support ratification of the treaty because they know it's critical for those living with disabilities in the united states and around the world. thanks to the a.d.a. and similar larks the united states has been so successful in providing accessibility and protection of rights that our nation is already in full compliance with all terms of the treaty. before transmitting this treaty, the obama administration conducted an exhaust i have comparison of the treaty's requirements to current united states law. here's what they found: the united states does not need to pass any new laws or regulations in order to fully meet the terms of the treaty. the fact that we've already met our exceed the treaty' treaty's requiremen
part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ o energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>shepard: if you like pork at grocery store and buy it there odds are it is loaded with stomach turning germs according to the "security reports." 70 percent of raw pork is contaminated with bacteria, serious germs which give you fever and crashes and bloody diarrhea. officials say 100,000 people get sick and have symptoms like bloody diarrhea each year. the chances of getting sick from pork are low. the germs die if you cook it right. the experts say this points to a bigger problem with the food supply. s
atomic energy agency which just said iran is not cooperating with nuclear inspectors. they also said iran has completed the installations of centrifuge tez fuel enrichment plant, a plant that can enrichure and yum to 20% which is crucial. it's at that level that it becomes easier to convert it to a weapon. >>> a judge has given a preliminary approval for hostess brands, the maker of twinkies to liquidate. hostess can now start the process of selling the bakeries, brands, and recipes. it will be the most valuable thing it has, everybody. the ceo told reporters after the hearing that they will move as quickly as possible to sole sell those brands. the sad part of 15,000 of the company's 18,500 employees will likely lose their jobs in the next few days. >> it has been 475 days since the united states lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? seems like we say it every week. mortgage rates another low. the average rate on a 30-year fixed 3.31%. as we said now for well over a year, interest rates are not the problem. >>> and now our fourth story "out front." what's at stake
the middle class with an energy tax and eventually, a value-added tax. he wants to have a conversation about a meaningless and small, but damaging dax on high income people and on savings and investment. what his real goal is in fact an energy tax on the middle class and we need to focus on and where are you getting the 8 billion dollars that you're talking about, trillion, trillion, trillion, i'm sorry, 8 trillion. stuart: we heard you. you know, grover, that c-span idea, that's a really, really good idea because the president did say he wanted that all those years ago. >> yeah. stuart: grover, i'm sorry i'm out of time, but i know you're going to be coming back between now and january the 1st and we welcome your return. thanks, grover. >> have a good time. take care. stuart: thanks, sir. in the middle east, a terror attack in tel aviv, a bomb on a bus exploded across from a military headquarters, at least 20 people wounded. this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton continues cease-fire talks between israel and gaza's militant hamas rulers. clinton held talks with palestinian preside
anything. the natural energy of peanuts and delicious, soft caramel. to fill you up and keep you moving, whatever your moves. payday. fill up and go! now imagine the worst case scenario. worse than that. [ woman screaming ] worse. that bad. [ lasers ] so now we need airbags. more airbags. perfect. give it smart brakes that excel in the wet. test it. test it. test it again. now put eyes in the back of its head. ditch the blind spot. [ lasers ] and that's how you make a car for an unsafe world. easy. ♪ ♪ >> eliot: how does hp make a mistake this big and i mean big! our number of the day $8.8 billion! that's how much hp says it overpaid for british software company. last year, hp bought autonomy for $11.1 billion. today hp announced that oops,oomi is -- autonomy is worth a fraction of that. autonomy misrepresented its finances. but if hp got hoodwinked, how? how could they miss something they claim is that big. autonomy was audited by deloitte and it was audited by kpmg, two of the big four accounting firms. they d
what we have achieved. when they have doubts about this let me quote the labor shout out energy minister, it means the most expensive deals would have to go being able to reduce the number of people to help get a clearer picture of what is happening and that could only be a good thing. that is the endorsement that i welcome. >> ed miller band. >> the governor promised there should be no rationing on grounds of cost alone. can the prime minister tell us whether he has kept that promise? >> the promise we have kept is that we would increase spending every year under this government and in britain, in england that is happening, in wales there's a massive cuts run by a neighbor. >> mr. speaker, several thousand fewer nurses with the public supporting and a very specific question about a promise by the secretary, the leader of the house, promise a year ago he promised a year ago that there will be no rationing. this is what the president of the world college of ophthalmologists recently said. he said this. pcs are not falling government guidelines. there restricting access to catarac
what we have achieved. when they have doubts about this let me quote the laborhout out energy minister, it means the most expensive deals would have to go being able to reduce the number of people to help get a clearer picture of what is happening and that could only be a good thing. that is the endorsement that i welcome. >> ed miller band. >> the governor promised there should be no rationing on grounds of cost alone. can the prime minister tell us whether he has kept that promise? >> the promise we have pt is that we would increase spending every year under this government and in britain, in england that is happening, in wales there's a massive cuts run by a neighbor. >> mr. speaker, seral thousand fewer nurses with the public supporting and a very specific question about a promise by the secretary, the leader of the house, promise a year ago he promised a year ago that there will be no rationing. this is what the president of the world college of ophthalmologists recently said. he said this. pcs are not falling government guidelines. there restricting access to caract surgery. he g
choices will obama actually make about energy and climate change? he admits we have a problem. that, as they say it is the first step. is there a second step in his news conference last week, the president held back on specific solutions mentioning only an education process and "a national conversation." what is the president willing to risk to address global warming and what can he do without congress's help? let's bring in congressman raul grijalva a member of the subcommittee on water and power. congressman, welcome and happy thanksgiving to you. >> happy thanksgiving to you. thank you. >> always a pleasure to have you. where will we go on climate change. we all understood perhaps in the first term, the president was overrun with economic issues and healthcare. climate change is one where many people are saying mr. president it is time to stand up and lead. do you think he will do so? >> yes. i think we allowed it to be framed whether it was the carbon tax discussion, whether it was anything dealing with the public l
. it is time to restore my energy. the president and i were joking about how bad i looked. it is time to take a vacation. >> what did you say about how he looks? >> i said i thought he looked great. [laughter] >> as a possible you will go into the white house? >> i have done that. i back to work on health care. i think my future is probably outside the white house helping him becoming part of whatever happens to our social movement to advocate for his agenda. >> it is up -- possible you would run about love for america on the outside. >> what we have to do first is have a discussion about what our people want to do. >> what is the horizon for making decisions about that? >> you will see us make decisions by the and not grow. that is natural. that is what we did last time. last time everybody thought we were going to do one thing. i do not think on election day we expect it to do that but we had discussions with our people and ended up doing that. it is clear healthcare would not have passed without that decision. >> the amazing thing the obama campaign has done, you were the first presidentia
jobs in our communities and looking -- i think, for example, energy development, what tolidine energy development. with the vast amount of tribal land in indian country, we had 15% of opportunities within indian country. we need to build the capacity and develop those kinds of ventures that will be helpful. host: colleen in wisconsin, you're on the air. oops, you are no longer on the air. i apologize -- could the producers get off the phone down there so that i can get back on? colleen from wisconsin. caller: can you hear me? host: we are listening. caller: ok. i now reside in the middle of wisconsin, but i was raised in ashland the field area -- the ashland bay field area in the extreme middle part of the state. with the oncoming legislative session, the last session we had a big fight over mining operations that were going to be pushed through that area near pearly, wisconsin, near ashland, wisconsin, which was supposed to produce 10,000 jobs. but the main concern of the indian leadership there was contamination of the brown water -- of the ground water, hunting land. how much do yo
energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. >>> the united states could now be considering sending more military power into the middle east in the wake of this latest wave of violence. let's bring in our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. what are you learning, barbara? >> well, wolf, a number of senior u.s. military officials tell us there are now discussions here inside the pentagon at very top levels about whether more military power is needed in the region because of the instability. one official telling us this is post-benghazi. the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. and now in addition problems of rising tensions all over the region, syria, israel, gaza, egypt. look at that map. that tells you exactly where this all starts.
who have lost so much are not forgotten on this holiday. >> that is fantastic. i love his energy and his spirit here. thank him for us and we're thinking about everyone here and everyone still reeling from that who re horrendous storm. >>> ahead on "starting point," could there be a lasting deal between israel and gaza? we will speak with mark brugev. you're watching "starting point." [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male anno
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, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. to get our adt security system. and one really big reason -- the house next door. our neighbor's house was broken into. luckily, her family wasn't there, but what if this happened here? what if our girls were home? and since we can't monitor everything 24/7, we got someone who could. adt. [ male announcer ] while some companies are new to home security, adt has been helping to save lives for over 135 years. we have more monitoring centers, more of tomorrow's technology right here today, and more value. 24/7 monitoring against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide, starting at just over $1 a day. and now get adt installed for just $99. isn't your family worth ame
and turn at night or wake up tired with no energy, the sleep number bed could be your solution. the sleep number bed's secret is it's air chambers which provide ideal support and put you in control of the firmness. and the bed is perfect for couples because each side adjusts independently to their unique sleep number. here's what clinical research has found: ® 93% of participants experienced back-pain relief. ® 90% reported reduced aches and pains. ® 87% fell asleep faster and enjoyed more deep sleep. for study summaries, call this number now. we'll include a free dvd and brochure about the sleep number bed including prices, and models plus a free $50 savings card. and how about this? steel springs can cause uncomfortable pressure points. but the sleep number bed contours to your body. imagine how good you'll feel when your muscles relax and you fall into a deep sleep! i'm not just a back surgeon, i'm also a back patient. i sleep on the sleep number bed myself and i highly recommend it to all of my patients. need another reason to call? the sleep number bed costs about the same as an i
. the company says that the energy department intentionally stalled its loan applications and those of other startups to force them out of business and protect companies favored about it administration. john fund is the national affairs columnist for the "national review." this sounds like a cool car, an inflatable car made from expanded foam. but it's a small startup company. they say thanks to crony capitalism they can't get the loan that they deserve. do you think they deserve a loan? >> i don't think any car company deserves a loan. we saw what happened when general motors became government motors. it hasn't worked out well. ronald reagan was right, when he warned businesses seeking help from the government. never get in bed with the government, you will never get a good night's sleep. the government is about politics. this $25 billion has so far only given four loans. and it's the big boys. shall we say -- bottom line, the government did exactly what it says it did. though they did get $1 million for a special experimental project. heather: but they applied for others which have been de
in spite of all that they've been through. >> reporter: do you think by bringing your energy into the community, you're also bringing grills, clean-up tools. this isn't just about let's have a grilling experience but it's also about what kind of help you can bring to these individuals. what do you expect? >> i expect that we're just going to come in with a lot of energy, but be very sensitive to the people here. and people are just going to go all day long and be the hands and feet of god. >> erin bagley, thank you very much. we had a look at some of these trucks filled with wheelbarrows, shovels and hammers. they are going to go into homes and actually rip out some of the drywall, insulation that was ruined in the flood. they're going to set up these grills whens they all done and have pies and chips and turkey burgers to tell thooe these people you are remember ed especially on a day like today. brooke? >> it's carol. thank you so much, deb feyerick. that warms my heart. we appreciate it. >>> you wouldn't think a raggedy old christmas troe would become a symbol of hope but
for the spoof. stay with us. you're in "the situation room." while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. i put away
with a shellacking. the last was wasting time and energy early on in his negotiation. and trying to negotiate with republicans when there was a stalemate. having learned from these mistakes the president has bypassed the stalemated congress and taken it to the people. here he was relying on his electoral connection. we saw a hint of this in his election night speech where he said the role of citizens in a democracy does not end with voting. that you have to stay active in pushing on the policies you need. so, we saw the hint, so we shouldn't be surprised he's taking the show on the road. >> when we look at the fact american people support his proposals, 72% say the gop should compromise, 67% on a mix of spending cuts and tax increases, 56% say we should raise tax on the wealthy. him going on the road is, what, to energize this and not leave it in washington like what was done before? is he learning from his mistakes of last time around? >> yeah, i think that's right. this is about learning. and this is -- he's basically undoing what he did wrong in the selling of obama care. he merely assumed
it has happened since october 4th. retailers drove the consumer discretionary sector energy industrials lead in the wake, and the rally started just minutes before house speaker made it clear that republicans are willing to deal on revenue and ready to find a resolution now. >> we all know that we have had this spending crisis coming at us like a freight train. it must be dealt with. and in order to try to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table, but it is time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. i am optimistic that we can continue to work together to avert this crisis sooner rather than later. lou: meanwhile, the president to a short time later claimed he is doing his part to make certain the middle class is not hit with tax increases. >> i want to reassure the american people and doing our part, sitting down with ceos, sitting down with labour leaders, talking to leaders in congress. i am ready and able and willing and excited to go ahead and did this issue resolved in a bipartisan fashion.
're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> shepard: baseball writers of america set toe decide a question asked for decades. do players suspected of using performance enhancing drugs deserve to be in the hall of fame? earlier today, three players widely suspected of using steroids made it under -- on to the ballot for the first time. barry bonds, pitching great roger clemens and sammy sosa. based on numbers alone each should be a lock for coopers town. but allegations of drug use have seriously damaged their chances. and now the folks who will be voting are faced with what could be their most controversial decision since the hall of fame banished the legendary pete rose. trace gallagher has. this trace, are the baseball writers indicating how they might vote here? >> well, the one i spoke with today, shep, rosenthal from fox sports. he was very adamant about saying that he will not vote for roger clemens, barry bonds, or sammy sosa. but he even took it a step further s
's a good burst of energy in iowa. iowa is a great political town. >> give me a good reason. >> gives everybody an early look at what's out there and gives us something to talk about. it gives political reporters something to report on. >> every single -- >> it's a very positive thing. >> initially, of course, it was all about the idea of the straw poll was it was an early indicator of how much organizational strength you have. right? but i do feel like today, in today's day and age, not so much. it really -- >> why is it no longer an indicator? >> look at michele bachmann. perfect example. she did very well at the beginning and she got people in and then she dropped out the day after the iowa caucuses because she simply couldn't hack it. i mean she couldn't even get people to the caucuses. so i think that that's -- i think it's so early in the process that it's more of a popularity contest/beauty contest than an actual organizational contest. >> let me ask you a question, i would imagine, you know, why is branstad sort of saying this. i have to imagine the straw poll brings money, br
well. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. >> let's go to fred that sits at the border with gaza. it has been hit many times by rockets. we saw you yesterday taking cover, duck ask cover, and some of those sirens going off. now you've got this reported cease-fire that's supposed to take effect in about 20 minutes, 22 minutes or so. what are you seeing from your vantage point? >> well, what we're seeing is actually a lot more air alarms going on here. again, it was actually very similar to what we had last night. we were, of course, on the air as well. the authorities here are urging people to stay either missed or close to a building, which is actual
make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >> shepard: well, u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice is about to face some of her most vocal critics on capitol hill. she is set to meet with republic senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelli eye yacht tomorrow according to senator mccain's office. the senator expects a lot of questions to be answered. analysts say president obama may nominate ambassador rice to be secretary of state and he may do so as soon as this week. the senators had said that she i
everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that we're just getting back and, so the energy level is probably going to be, mellow, which we'll make that work for us, since we're going to talk about what sometimes is contentious subject. today's panel is on the question of for-profits and federal education policy. this is a topic that we ad aei have been interested in and talking about for an extended stretch. the last couple of years with the generous support of the templeton foundation we have been running the private enterprise and american education project trying to think about both the opportunities and the challenges, the upsides and the downsides of having for-profits involved in k-12 and higher education. how do we make this work for kids and communities how do we think about some of the challenges and, potential perils of having for-profits involved. this panel is the close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number about of pieces of new research which will be coming out as a book this spring with futures college press at columbia university.
to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichment facility find that iran continues to expand enrichment pass the iranian patrician capacity. 20% levels which is closer to the 90% for weapons grades and iran continues to refuse to address the iaea's questions about the potential military dimensions of its nuclear program. and it continues to resist tougher international inspections known as the iaea additional protocol. so we believe that there is time and clearly there's an interest from all parties to reach a diplomatic solution. and after several rounds of negotiations between the p5+1, and iran, it looks as though there will be a new round of talks in the next month, but perhaps early in 2011. it's also clear that the two sides have put forward specific concrete proposal, but those proposals have some different ideas come particularly about the sequencing of the steps necessary to assure the international community that iran's program is peaceful and from ever
™. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> moments ago three gop lawmakers addressed the microphones, talking about a meeting they left with ambassador susan rice. they were trying to talk out what exactly happened when susan rice appeared on national television to talk about benghazi. and you may recall she said that the benghazi attack on that consulate in -- on that consulate in benghazi, libya, was the result maybe of this anti-islam film. it turned out not to be the case. the meeting was supposed to smooth things over between ambassador rice and the senators. as you hear from senator lindsay graham, don't think much smoothing over occurred. let'
and energy in the democratic caucus, i think the are -- meals on wheels. >>> it's a good thing that you're eating thanksgiving dinner separately. >> we're grateful for each other and you. >> happy thanksgiving to everybody. let's give thanks the election is over and we're not in a recount mode. >> amen, sister. >>> we're wrapping up the political conversation today, but if you think talking about the latest election tomorrow, if you're thinking about you can thatting about it tomorrow during the feast, you might want to think again. why one psychologist says that could be a recipe for disaster. we'll be right back. >>> the holidays start out with such high hopes, families coming together eating lots of delicious food, but for some all that family time can lead to fights, big ones. and the tensions around your holiday table may be even stronger. joining me is jeff gardier. >> some americans are still very upset about the outcome of the election, but you have some advice, so let's go through it. first, you say set ground rules at the dinner table. what do you mean by that? >> letting your
listing the entire energy sector. what do each of you think what effect that might have and in particular how might that effect the international coalition that's negotiating with the iranians and also participating in the u.n. security council imposed sanctions? because part of the success i think over the last couple of three years is that there does appear to be greater unity amongst the p-5 plus one about the approach. so how might that affect the dynamics here if congress were to go forward? >> may i have the question? i hope it is wrong but removing the congress and try to block i would say nongovernmental dialogue, you know. it's destructive and harmful approach. catastrophe, i would say, if it's implemented. maybe it's a typical -- >> i think what you said earlier, rolf, was so important about the iraq experience and the madeline albright. you said we sanctioned a country. they sort of do what we want them to do and then someone announces, it doesn't matter what you do because we'll keep the sanctions regardless and the thing falls apart. that's the situation i fear with the u.s.
of what i've been looking for for cease-fire. at the u.n. secretary-general have put energy behind this. egypt is playing a strong role. the visit of secretary clinton will bolster that, and all of us in the e.u. countries also determined to do so. so a lot of effort is being made behind this cease-fire proposal. >> cannot press the foreign cretary to say something more about what the future conversations he had with his fellow e.u. ministers on gaza, and also what conversation she's having with the special representatives of egypt's? >> well, we have the whole e.u. a fair council meeting yesterday, and there were the conclusions published from that, calling and very much in line with what i've said to the house in terms of the need to end rocket attacks on issue but also as a support for a negotiated caesar. so the whole of the e.u. year and spoke together on that yesterday. of course, we also regulate discuss matters with tony blair, e envoy of the quartet to the palestinians. i most recently spoke to him 10 days, nine days ago about this. my colleagues are in constant touch with him,
kyl. then on c-span, a forum on energy policy hosted by the bipartisan policy center. former senators and byron dorgan. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> on 16 of 17 bases in the united states we have military-run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our bases use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay every public school system 14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma senator about the fiscal clef, affordable care act to amend the future of the republican party on book tv. the senator has written several books and reports, including his latest, the debt bomb. join our three our conversation with calls, e-mails, tweet, and facebook comments. live sunday at noon eastern on book tv in depth on c-span2. >> there has been speculation in washington about whether or not the senate would change its rules regarding the filibuster when congress re
. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> you want to see where our economy is really going? financial analyst say look no further than the 1930s. we may take a trip back to the days when roosevelts election derailed from the depression. >> gretchen: stewart varney went back to the 30s and fast forward here. >> not just me. first year of fdr's second term was 1937 and it was a terrible year for the economy. dow jones industrial was cut in half . unemployment 15 percent and it was a depression within the big depression of the 1930s. is the parallels between then and now. fdr raised taxings. president obama is going to raise taxes. many of the big themed policies of the first term of fdr were implemented in the second term. same with president obama and think obama care and financial reform . attacking wall street as the villian. president roosevelt did that . wall street was the villians and shades of that exactly. 2013 president obama wall street is the villi
talk a little about was natural gas and fracking and how it might change our energy and we're look about bright lights. can you give us a bright light and perhaps that and why we should be optimistic. >> the bright lights are here, one, you'd rather have america's problem as serious as they are in those than any of the major companies we compete with, certainly europe and japan. i would argue china, as well. two, we are the cutting edge of change in a knowledged economy. our universities are the best universities. we're the country that people from all over want to come to. think about any of the great entrepreneurs of this era and there's a very good chance you're thinking of an american. three, as you say mark, we have a remarkable competitive position in natural gas. we've got huge amounts of it that can be produced at very low cost. we had a very important economic decision to make. should we keep it captive and use the lower costs to support american manufacturers to support other american businesses? or should we allow it to be exported, improving our competitive position, ge
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